Collection: Part 3

P3 Research

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Charcters

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Character analysis

From the play, I was most drawn to Billy Bilbbit and Charles Cheswick, two supporting characters who show a lot of expression in their faces, body language and distinct concern within their voices.

I noticed they both characters have similar characteristics and story plots within the play, Cheswick expresses his childlike characteristic by asking for permission by those superior to him, he seems confused and on occasion throwing tantrums.

"May I have my cigarettes, Please Mrs Ratched"

"I ain't no little kid, I ain't no little kid"

Bibbit shows that he thinks very highly of his mother, a mommies boy, young and little experience with his sexuality. In need of comfort and closure from the ward he is a voluntary patient. He becomes anxious and concerned when Mrs Ratched threatens to tell his mother about his spontaneous night, an idea forced upon him by McMurphy and the rest of the patients. This experience allowed him to grow as a person and take actions of his own. Mrs. Ratched, a powerful woman who intimidates Billy further due to being friends with his mother,  takes him to the breaking point of suicide in fear of being thought of by his mother. I thought it was interesting that both of these characters have similar issues and result in suicide, Cheswick seeks comfort from McMurphy, looking up to him for encouragement and influenced to fight against society. Responsibilities are given to him such as driving a boat gives him a reason to live. When Randy loses his confident, Cheswick becomes lost and returns to his childlike state, not having an adult figure to look up to, commits suicide. 

"P-p-p-please d-d-don't tell my m-m-m-mother"

Both characters needed support and comfort from others, they need comfort from others to guide them through life. As the ward have little emotional and mental support they result to physical actions to 'help' the patients. They look to others as role models in the world as support and guidance, when both characters are ripped from their 'other' they are lost, feeling alone lost and empty. Their dependants on McMurphy or Billy's mother show how important the character is within their lives.

However it's surprising that neither of the characters was given lobotomies or much physical medical attention, they confined to the rules within the ward and didn't act out. It shows how much of the main character McMurphy was within the mental institute. A person confined to being an inpatient because of his rebellious behaviour, with no proper diagnosis of being mentally ill, he was forced to follow society, not caring about his punishment and living in the moment allowing him to act out, escaping from the institute, sleeping with prostitutes and attacking those with superior authority and power (Mrs Ratched). His character also rubs off on other patients, giving them a life and a reason for life, sadly for McMurphy because of his attitude towards society and little progress towards a mental institute, the alternative was to physical alter his mind to follow society with a lobotomy.

 "Mmmmmm, Juicy Fruit."

I found it inspiring that Chief was mute in the play and how this allowed him to be a wall flower the ward. Characters within the play perceived this as him being uneducated and dim, however like the other patients, he was not hassled by staff or threatened with treatment. This presents how little educated and ignorant people were about other cultures and their attitude towards people of different colour.It shows that Chief is the smartest within the ward, his powerful figure making him intimidating, but shows to be a caring and responsible figure confining to the wards orders. When Randle Mcmurphy enters the scene, he befriends chief, including him in activities and being a part of the institute. This secures Randles position in the ward against staff, seen when Randle fights Nurse Ratched and has a team of staff around him, Chief step in and easily defense Randle from being harmed.

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Nurse Ratched: Aren't you ashamed? 
Billy: No, I'm not. 
[Applause from friends
Nurse Ratched: You know Billy, what worries me is how your mother is going to take this. 
Billy: Um, um, well, y-y-y-you d-d-d-don't have to t-t-t-tell her, Miss Ratched. 
Nurse Ratched: I don't have to tell her? Your mother and I are old friends. You know that. 
Billy: P-p-p-please d-d-don't tell my m-m-m-mother. 

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Costume deisgn

What did you notice, find interesting, unusual, interesting, inspiring

From the picture below I wanted to study how costume effected the characters personality and the position they played within the institute. White is shown as the uniform colour many of the characters wear, a colour which is related to being clean and easy to wash, a simple design which used little money to make or throw away if needed, however the use of a uniforms also strips the individual of being a unique character, unable to express their personality through their clothing and other accessories they may wear. The ideas relate to being in a prison, lowering the person's authority in society and in some cases shaving their head and removing shoes as an extra measurement.

((This is a discussion many school encounter, whether the pupil should or shouldn't wear a uniform and the pros and cons which go along with the argument. The answer for many schools around the UK is that it creates equality, less of a reason to be bullied and judged on about class and wealth. It also allows the student to be recognised by others, if they decide to run away or if unwanted people enter the building, they are able to distinctly point out who belongs to a part of the school and who should be removed, allowing for a safe environment. Overall this action is not to belittle the childs authority but to keep them safe and be a good ambassador towards the schools reputation. Other schools disagree with this idea especially seen in north America. They believe a student should be able to choose what they wear giving them freedom. If a uniform is worn, it acts as a society logo, wearing cheerleading outfits, marching band or football jackets. In contrast to this, UK school normally use badges to present authority or leadership towards a group such as house captain or council.))

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BBC Documentary

To get a better understanding I looked for documentaries covering the history of mental institutes. I found most of the information very shocking and graphic. I was interested to see how dealing mental health has changed over the years and the theories they had on curing diseases during the time. Their ideas made sense, however, weren't thought out properly, such as humanity, care, and long term issues.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oswUssXzFlY

I was also surprised to find out that numerous people were admitted for acute illnesses such as agoraphobia. One form of treatment was being injected with insulin, which forcing the body to go into coma's. "allowing for the mind to rest". However, some patients showed sign of side effects and started fitting, they showed little signs of consideration about the individual patient. Other unexpected actions were throwing water over patients for no reason followed by hitting the patient over the head. Their reasoning was "when you work with shit, you become shit". I found this shocking even though this was a minor action.

They talk about the building itself and the long corridors within the ward. Patients would pace the corridors of the asylum all day, but never have enough time to finish the entire building as one corridor turning into another one. This is an idea of how big the building was and the possibility of how many people it could hold.

download.php?file=1992717&view=179357&em

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Lobotomies

http://www.livescience.com/42199-lobotomy-definition.html

Doctors first began manipulating the brain to calm patients in the late 1880s, when the Swiss physician Gottlieb Burkhardt removed parts of the cortex of the brains of patients with auditory hallucinations and other symptoms of schizophrenia, noting that it made them calm 

The first procedures involved cutting a hole in the skull and injecting ethanol into the brain to destroy the fibers that connected the frontal lobe to other parts of the brain. Later, Moniz introduced a surgical instrument called a leucotome, which contains a loop of wire that, when rotated, creates a circular lesion in the brain.

About 50,000 lobotomies were performed in the United States, and Freeman himself performed between 3,500 and 5,000.

While a small percentage of people supposedly got better or stayed the same, for many people, lobotomy had negative effects on a patient's personality, initiative, inhibitions, empathy and ability to function on their own.

"The main long-term side effect was mental dullness," Lerner said. People could no longer live independently, and they lost their personalities, he said.

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Cliffnotes view on characters

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Main Themes

http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/cuckoo/themes.html

Themes:

Women as Castrators

"Bromden, the narrator, and McMurphy, the protagonist, both tend to describe the suffering of the mental patients as a matter of emasculation or castration at the hands of Nurse Ratched and the hospital supervisor, who is also a woman. The fear of women is one of the novel’s most central features. The male characters seem to agree with Harding, who complains, “We are victims of a matriarchy here.”"

Society’s Destruction of Natural Impulses

Kesey uses mechanical imagery to represent modern society and biological imagery to represent nature. By means of mechanisms and machines, society gains control of and suppresses individuality and natural impulses. The hospital, representative of society at large, is decidedly unnatural: the aides and Nurse Ratched are described as being made of motley machine parts.

McMurphy represents unbridled individuality and free expression—both intellectual and sexual. One idea presented in this novel is that a man’s virility is equated with a state of nature, and the state of civilized society requires that he be desexualized. But McMurphy battles against letting the oppressive society make him into a machinelike drone, and he manages to maintain his individuality until his ultimate objective—bringing this individuality to the others—is complete. However, when his wildness is provoked one too many times by Nurse Ratched, he ends up being destroyed by modern society’s machines of oppression.

The Importance of Expressing Sexuality
  McMurphy’s refusal to conform to society mirrors his refusal to desexualize himself, and the sexuality exuding from his personality is like a dress waving in the wind like a flag.

McMurphy attempts to cure Billy Bibbit of his stutter by arranging for him to lose his virginity with Candy. Instead, Billy gets shamed into suicide by the puritanical Ratched. By the end of the novel, McMurphy has been beaten into the ground to the point that he resorts to sexual violence—which had never been a part of his persona previous to being committed, despite Nurse Pilbow’s fears—by ripping open Ratched’s uniform.

False Diagnoses of Insanity

McMurphy’s sanity, symbolized by his free laughter, open sexuality, strength, size, and confidence, stands in contrast to what Kesey implies, ironically and tragically, is an insane institution. Nurse Ratched tells another nurse that McMurphy seems to be a manipulator, just like a former patient, Maxwell Taber. Taber, Bromden explains, was a “big, griping Acute” who once asked a nurse what kind of medication he was being given. He was subjected to electroshock treatments and possibly brain work, which left him docile and unable to think. The insanity of the institution is foregrounded when a man who asks a simple question is tortured and rendered inhuman. It is a Catch-22: only a sane man would question an irrational system, but the act of questioning means his sanity will inevitably be compromised. 

Motifs:

Invisibility

Many important elements in the novel are either hidden from view or invisible. For example, Bromden tries to be as invisible as possible. He has achieved this invisibility by pretending not to understand what is going on around him, so people notice him less and less. Moreover, he imagines a fog surrounding him that hides him and keeps him safe. He keeps both his body and his mind hidden.

When McMurphy smashes through the glass window of the Nurses’ Station, his excuse is that the glass was so clean he could not see it. By smashing it, he reminds the patients that although they cannot always see Ratched’s or society’s manipulation, it still operates on them.

The Power of Laughter

The power of laughter resonates throughout the novel. McMurphy’s laughter is the first genuine laughter heard on the ward in years. McMurphy’s first inkling that things are strange among the patients is that none of them are able to laugh; they can only smile and snicker behind their hands. For McMurphy, laughter is a potent defense against society’s insanity, and anyone who cannot laugh properly has no chance of surviving. By the end of the fishing trip, Harding, Scanlon, Doctor Spivey, and Sefelt are all finally able to participate in real, thunderous laughter, a sign of their physical and psychological recovery.

Real Versus Imagined Size

Bromden describes people by their true size, not merely their physical size. Kesey implies that when people allow others, such as governments and institutions, to define their worth, they can end up far from their natural state. Nurse Ratched’s true size, for example, is “big as a tractor,” because she is powerful and unstoppable. Bromden, though he is six feet seven inches tall, feels much smaller and weaker. He tells McMurphy, “I used to be big, but not no more.” As for McMurphy, Bromden says he is “broad as Papa was tall,” and his father was named The Pine That Stands Tallest on the Mountain. Bromden says his mother was twice the size of he and his father put together, because she belittled them both so much. With McMurphy’s help, Bromden is gradually “blown back up to full size” as he regains his self-esteem, sexuality, and individuality.

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The Electroshock Therapy Table

The electroshock therapy table is explicitly associated with crucifixion. It is shaped like a cross, with straps across the wrists and over the head. Moreover, the table performs a function similar to the public crucifixions of Roman times. Ellis, Ruckly, and Taber—Acutes whose lives were destroyed by electroshock therapy—serve as public examples of what happens to those who rebel against the ruling powers. Ellis makes the reference explicit: he is actually nailed to the wall. This foreshadows that McMurphy, who is associated with Christ images, will be sacrificed.

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One flew over the Cuckoo's nest vs Girl interupted

https://justanotherbodiesoffilmblog.wordpress.com/2013/04/06/32/

At first glance, Girl, Interrupted (1999) appears to be something of a female-centric retelling of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest(1975). Both take place in psychiatric hospitals; both portray main characters whose mental states are not always clear (are Susanna and McMurphy truly mentally ill, or is it an act?). Several plot points overlap–for instance, characters in both films are driven to suicide at similar points in the plot, each film contains a short escape into the outside world that ends in a return to the hospital, and both involve an illegal nighttime escapade that results in punishment (Susanna and Lisa singing outside Polly’s door, McMurphy’s party). However, the two films differ radically in their treatment of madness and the institution of the asylum.By contrast, to one flew over the cuckoo's nest the staff member most prominently featured in Girl, Interrupted–Valerie–is portrayed as having Susanna’s best interests at heart, whether this is shown through tenderness or through the “tough love” that (according to the film) Susanna needs.

Girl, Interrupted portrays a very different picture of mental illness and mental hospitals. The outer trappings of the two hospitals are identical. Both are white and sterile. Both have a glass-enclosed nurse’s station through which mysterious (and mandatory) medication is handed to a line of patients. Both are isolated from the rest of the world but allow little privacy, including communal bathrooms. In One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nestpatients are locked out of their rooms during the day, and in Girl, Interrupted the staff performs periodic, frequent “checks” to every bedroom.

Both movies deal with suicide as well, but Daisy (Girl, Interrupted) and Billy (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest) commit suicide for very different reasons. While Billy is driven to despair by his environment–Nurse Ratched in particular, when she uses her power to manipulate him back into conformity and asexuality–Daisy commits suicide after Lisa, the hospital’s foremost rebel, sworn enemy of the system, and in many ways a classic revenge seeker, taunts her mercilessly about her past and her father, saying that Daisy cannot escape her problems even outside the hospital.

As they travel deeper into the microcosm of their respective psychiatric wards, McMurphy moves toward insanity while Susanna moves toward a functional life in the outside world.One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest blames social systems and brutal outside forces for the mental illness of many of its characters. When they are temporarily set free from the ward’s confines, whether mentally or physically, they are no different from–and certainly not inferior to–the people outside.

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List of things people were admitted for:

To be admitted to one of these asylums, the local JP and a doctor had to certify you insane. To protect against corruption, the doctor who signed the certificate could not be affiliated with the asylum in any way.

It was a massive improvement on the previous system. Patients included those with learning disabilities, epilepsy, senile dementia, and the grandiose delusions and physical paralysis that accompanied tertiary neuro-syphilis. Alcoholics and drug abusers often ended up in asylums as well. Many women passed through asylums too, usually suffering post-natal depression, or puerperal fever – then a common post-natal infection leading to mania and sometimes death.

Thousands of people passed through the county asylums, but they actually tried hard to keep patients out, for one simple reason. The Victorians hated paying taxes for public services even more than we do. But there was simply so much medical need, and nowhere else for many needy people to go except the asylum.

What, then, of the absurd diagnoses in the admissions table? Nineteenth century mad-doctors knew next to nothing about the mind. They tried to discover what had triggered a mental breakdown, and list that incident as the ’cause’ of the illness. This remained the case until Emil Kraepelin, a stereotypically logical German Professor of psychiatry, came out of leftfield with a wild new idea. He classified mental illness according to prognosis, instead of cause. He swept away the confused jumble of religious mania and excess novel-reading, and replaced it all with a logical, simple, practical, system. Apart from neurological disorders and diseases of old age, there were only two mental disorders. Manic-depressive disorders, from which patients would usually recover, if only at intervals, and schizophrenia – delusions with the mood being affected – which patients would never recover from. Kraepelin’s model of mental illness still forms the basis of all modern psychiatry.

http://katetyte.com/medicalhistory/how-to-get-admitted-to-a-victorian-lunatic-asylum/

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Electric Shock theraphy

What is ECT and what is it used for?

ECT involves sending an electric current through the brain to trigger an epileptic fit, with the aim, in most cases, of relieving severe depression. It is occasionally used to treat mania or catatonia. The treatment is given under a general anaesthetic and uses muscle relaxants, so that the muscles only twitch slightly, and the body does not convulse during the fit.

ECT is used if you:

  • have severe, life-threatening depression
  • have not responded to medication or talking treatments
  • have found it helpful in the past and have asked to receive it again
  • are experiencing a manic episode which is severe or is lasting a long time
  • are catatonic (staying frozen in one position for a long time; or repeating the same movement for no obvious reason; or being extremely restless, unrelated to medication)
  • have severe postnatal depression. Because, when it works, ECT usually works very quickly, it can minimise the time that you are not able to care for and bond well with your baby (see postnatal depression).

It can be an effective treatment if you are seriously depressed, and no other treatment has worked for you. It is also suitable when it is important to have an immediate effect; for example, because you are so depressed that you are unable to eat or drink, and are in danger of kidney failure.

http://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/drugs-and-treatments/electroconvulsive-therapy-ect/#.Vx3Nk5MrKRs

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Body Language

Language of closure

Closure literally closes the body up. It may range from a slight bringing together of the limbs to curled up into a tight ball. Extreme cases may also include rhythmic rocking of the body to and fro.

Arms across

In a closed positions one or both arms cross the central line of the body. They may be folded or tightly clasped or holding one another. There may also be holding one another.

Lighter arm crossing may include resting an arm on a table or leg, or loosely crossed with wrists crossing.

Varying levels of tension may be seen in the arms and shoulders, from a relaxed droop to tight tension and holding on to the body or other arms.

Legs across

Legs, likewise can be crossed. There are several styles of leg crossing, including the ankle cross, the knee cross, the figure-four (ankle on opposite knee) and the tense wrap-around.

Legs may also wrap around convenient other objects, such as chair legs.

When legs are crossed but arms are not, it can show deliberate attempts to appear relaxed. This is particularly true when legs are hidden under a table.

Looking down or away

The head may be inclined away from the person, and particularly may be tucked down.

http://changingminds.org/techniques/body/closed_body.htm

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Relaxing

And we also cross our arms and legs when we are relaxing. It can just be a comfortable place to put those gangly limbs. We may look away because we are thinking, nothing more.

Opening

When you are trying to persuade a person, then their standing or sitting in a closed position is usually a signal that they are not ready to be persuaded. Moving them to an open position can significantly increase your chances of persuading them.

Force hand use

A common method sales people use to break a crossed-arms closed position is to give the person something to hold or otherwise ask them to use their hands, for example asking them to hand over something, turn over a page, stand up and so on.

Following

The other common method of opening a person is to first adopt a closed position like them. Then some effort is put into building a bond with them, such that they start to like you and are attaching their identity to yours. Finally, you then open your position, unfolding arms and legs. If they are sufficiently bonded then they will follow you.

This should be done naturally and steadily, for example unfolding your arms in order to use your hands to illustrate what you are saying. If they do not follow you, return to the closed position and work further at bonding before trying again.

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Posable lite

Using an apple application 'Posable lite' which manipulates a digital mannequin to create different positions. From this, I have been able to observe the anatomy of the body and documents stereotypical movements when depressed.

I found the app very hard to use as the buttons were not clearly labelled, making the entire making process very long of changing and then reversing the movement. In the end, I had a good enough idea about the app that I was able to make some representations of signs indicating closed body language. From playing around with the app It allowed me to understand all the movement possible in the body. Little details had to be altered in order to create the desired effect and it was obvious when something was missing as it "stuck out like a sore thumb" Literally have to change the smallest things like turning of the wrist, pointed or flexed feet and change in spine placement.

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Reasons for closing

There can be several reasons for closed body language. This is one reason why reading body language can be hazardous and you should take into account other factors. In particular look for the transition when the body closes and the triggers that may have caused this change.

Defending

When we feel threatened, our body language becomes defensive. We use closure to place the barriers of our arms and legs across in front of us to defend ourselves from attack. When we close, we also make our body smaller, reducing the size of the target. When we tuck our chin down, we are protecting the exposed throat.

We also may be signaling to the other person that we are not a threat to them. Thus the held-in arms shows that we are not attacking and looking away from them removes aggressive staring.

In a variant of this, particularly where the person is holding themselves, a closed position may indicate self-nurturing. The person is effectively holding or hugging themselves in an imitation of a parent or other caring person.

Hiding

Closing also may serve the purpose of hiding something that we do not want the other person to see. Holding the body still prevents it from betraying our thoughts. Looking away prevents the other person from seeing our expression that may show dislike or lying.

Cold

A more pragmatic form of closure is when we are cold. Huddling up reduces exposed body area and reduces heat loss. Holding warmer parts of the body against colder parts evens the temperature and prevents extremities from being chilled too much.

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When looking for artists which create visual performances I can across Tony Orrico. He uses his own body as a drawing instrument, thinking about his arm span and his head and torso as the centre of the circle, he is able to use his body as a piece of artwork. With a pencil in each hand, he creates giant pieces circling the floor and turning after each movement. This piece is titled Penwald, made up of eight different circles, each using a different movement in his hand and turning clockwise. He starts by lining himself up to face north at the start of each art piece and works his way around.

Eight circles:

Anthropology : drawing arm span

Once to the right atrial light : Tracing the head and torso

Roll once to the right - Geology : "Roll once to the right" is the scale, chemistry

Infinity symbols: figure of eight showing astronomy

once to the right magnets - physics

Triangle : mathematics

Pea pods : lobotomy 

Starfish : zoology

 

The piece also creates audio for itself, the scraping of the pencils against the paper creates a repetitive motion, and the sound of his legs propelling his body around the circles add a tempo to his work. I thought these pieces were really effective, entirely unique as he is only him, I thought the performance mainly covered the process of making as it had a stronger impact than the final outcome.

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Dancing in real clothes

Adam Cooper as the Swan in ‘Swan Lake', Lez Brotherston, 1995. Museum no. 2006AL4673

‘No one ever asks me to do classical ballet, everything I’ve done with Christopher Gable and everything I’ve done with Matthew Bourne has been set within the last couple of hundred years and more tailored and I prefer that because it’s not a fake, a jacket will do what it does. It doesn’t always have to be skinny, stuck to the body.

'Period costumes have to move with the body, but dancers like tight-fitting costumes. However, a jacket that fits too snugly will rise with the arms and stay up. The battle is to get the dancers to accept looser fittings that move up and down the body. Occasionally you go “OK, fine, let’s pin it. That’s where you want it. Now lift your arms up. Oh look, it doesn’t come down. That’s why we’re not doing i". You really have to prove it to them.’

So costume fittings can be fraught: ‘it’s that relationship thing again – when you’ve been working with someone like Adam (dancer Adam Cooper) for twelve or thirteen years I know he’s not difficult. If he says “I’ll make it work”, he’ll make it work. If he says “I’m having problems with this", it’s a problem and I can’t ignore it. For me, what they’re bothered about is a judgement on how good they are as performers.  Different dancers have different foibles, different likes. It’s only when you’ve worked with them a lot that you know, there are some people you know are worth doing it for.'

 

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/i/lez-brotherston-in-conversation/

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Rosas Danst Rosas

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Videodança

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlLZExpgBOY

When thinking about performances which used everyday movements and body language my mind turned back to a dance I once created inspired by Rosas Danst Rosas. It covered the idea of showing everyday movements done during the day and used repetition, canon and union between groups of three or more women to create an effective breathy piece.

 

Choreography: Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker

Music: Thierry De MeyPeter Vermeersch

Costumes: Rosas

Awards: Bessie Awards for the light design (1987) and choreography (1987) in New York. The dance was also awarded the Eve du Spectacle by L'Association des Journalistes du Spectacle (1989).

Film adaptions: Thierry De Mey filmed a screen adaption of the dance in 1997. This version was filmed in the old building of the technical school of architect Henry Van de Velde in Leuven. It is shorter than the actual stage production, and includes more members of the company than the usual four dancers.[8]

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Butoh

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Butoh dance: A form of Japanese dance covering taboo topics. The performers are normally cover in white body paint, using slow and controlled motions. Their outfits are minimal, only covering needed areas of the body and their bald heads with unnatural skin colour made them appear supernatural. I thought there was a lot of expressions shown within their pieces adding to the performance making it intense and created a suspension. The abstract movements used made it seem they were in pain or anger within themselves. The pace of the performance allowed me to analyse every movement and what they were trying to portray to the audience. I found certain Butoh dance very disturbing at times as it showed a lot of emotion.

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Webmd.com mental-health-stereotypic-movement-disorder

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Nonverbal communication

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The most common treatment approaches used for children with this condition are therapies aimed at reducing stress that may trigger the movements and changing behaviors. A child who engages in picking at the skin or hitting may be taught to keep his hands in his pockets when he feels the urge to pick or hit. Relaxation techniques also may be used to help the child resist the urges.

In some cases, antidepressants such as LuvoxProzac, and Zoloft(selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs), or Anafranil (a tricyclic antidepressant) may be helpful.

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After researching about body language and movement within the body I was also interested to find out that there was an illness with encounters uncontrollable movement involving rocking, jitters and hitting

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Final proposal

Pinterest

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Mcqueen Spraypaint

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Carrying on from the idea of visual moving art I remember a garment created by Alexander Mcqueen using machines to spray paint a dress. The outcome to this garments was messy, careless and thoughtless, however, there was a clear sign of movement within the garment as it developed over time to reveal a yellow and black design. This was the main stimulus of the design.

When seeing this dress in real life at the V&A  it was much grander in person, it managed to take up so much space in the exhibition that it created a personality of its own, sitting amongst the audience in the middle of the room and growing a design of its own. Other work covering evolution made me want to look at growing work further. Seeing a design process similar to penwald 2:8 circles gives a sense of accomplishment when the design is complete. 

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26: Leah Miriam on Flickr

Following to the idea of beauty and gore, I found an artist who created fake blood designs using glitter. This inspired me to create some of my own, finding materials which were suitable for attaching to my face and didn't cause a safety hazard, I found large beads which were suitable for placing in my mouth without danger of choking of getting stuck such as rhinestones. 

My final outcome worked well, showing a clear link between the artists designs and my own interpretations. These designs are more specifically aimed towards film based creations rather than photo shoots.

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Orphelia

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Ophelia is a painting by British artist Sir John Everett Millais, completed between 1851 and 1852. It is held in the Tate Britain in London. It depicts Ophelia, a character from William Shakespeare's play Hamlet, singing before she drowns in a river in Denmark.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophelia_(painting)

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Most recognized for performance as a non-traditional method of painting, Brown uses her body as a tool to create artifacts that are remnants of her process. Reminiscent of abstract expressionist studies, Brown produces aesthetically whimsical paintings with a deep underlining rawness of human emotion. Viewing the body as a vessel for spiritual practice, Brown pushes her physical and mental boundaries to reach a state of enlightenment from which creative expression and healing derives.

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Pinterest

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Hussein chalayan dissolving dress

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In comparison to garments evolving I also started looking at garments which deteriorated, I felt the effects were similar in ways as they both modified their designs to reveal a change in the overall structure. The dress seen above was shown at a fashion show where showers were installed at the centre of the stage. As models walk up onto the platform their soluble garments would dissolve as the outfit became completely immersed in water. One the fabric was fully dissolved the garment underneath was revealed to be much more designed and well fitting compared to the original bulky design due to its main feature of covering the dress underneath. 

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An impossible wardrobe for the invisible

Another artist which I came across had also used soluble fabric within their design, however their approach was very unique. Unlike the previous artists revealing a surprise transformation garment underneath, this artist created a very simple yet effect outcome to using soluble fabric in its original purpose. To wash away. 

 

Garments presented were viewed in a swimming pool or small rock pool, As the performers entered the pool their garments washed away. Some designs were only viewed from the waist up, this meant that their garments were not below the water and resulted in half of the garment still visible on the top half. This was a very way of thinking working almost as a stencil or dip dye effect. I thought in way of how I could incorporate these effects into my own design as 

I thought of ways in how I could incorporate these effects into my own design. I thought they showed representation link between material and emotion, feelings being washed away and dissolved by the water. A transition on design similar to how a person may occur an illness and recover.

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http://www.juxtapoz.com/Gallery/alyssa-monks/alyssa-monks-20129-30340/

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mutant baby doilies: a luxurious skin disease (group collaboration)

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Concept: Imagining luxury fashion techniques applied as a luxurious skin disease or the idea of luxury fashion and cosmetics as a skin disease, death/disease/decay vs. embellishment/decoration/beautification.
Materials: kimono fabric scraps, crocheted 100% wool yarn, beads/semi-precious stones, applied with scar make-up on skin
Freehand machine embroidery and beading by Allison Bell
Beading and crochet by Adel Ng
Photography and post-production: Mel T
Make-up by: Nicki
Models: JacintaKat, Jess

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Experimental Textiles Design exploring the theme of human skin using embroidery on devore for contrast & texture // Abigail Barnes

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Abigail Barnes

Current inspiration and influence revolves around the human anatomy and the concept of natural biological processes and chemical reactions- particularly focusing on The Integumentary System. Defining skin characteristics I create biological textiles that metaphorically demonstrate the anatomical change of ‘ageing’, highlighting the manipulation that the human skin faces. Versatility within my practice is demonstrated throughout the featured textile processes I choose to develop- I use three-dimensional embroidery techniques to create layers mimicking skin-like qualities.

http://www.artsthread.com/profile/abigailbarnes/

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